Conférence : “Ancient Foreign Glasswares Found in Silla Burials in the Korean Peninsula”

silla glass_blog

 

Conférence d’Ariane Perrin (UMR 8173 « Chine, Corée, Japon »), dans le cadre du panel « Reception and Re-interpretation of the material culture of the Other: Case Studies from China and Korea between the 2nd century BCE and the 10th century CE » du colloque international de la Society for East Asian Archaeology (SEAA):

 

“Ancient Foreign Glasswares Found in Silla Burials in the Korean Peninsula”

SEAA 7, Cambridge/Boston

12 juin 2016, Boston university, à 11h00

 

A number of glasswares of foreign origin (beakers, cups with raised decor, marbled glass, moulded glass) have been found in tombs of the elite of the 4th-6th centuries AD in the Korean peninsula. While it is not yet known how these glasswares found their way in these tombs, they are suggestive of international contacts and exchanges along a trail that extends from northern China to the Japanese archipelago, where similar vessels were unearthed in Nara. Recent archaeological findings and chemical analysis have revealed that these glasswares belonged to two different traditions, a so-called Roman and a Sasanian one. Through comparisons with similar objects found in northern China in burials of the Northern Wei dynasty in Datong, this paper will present the current research in the field, and will investigate the techniques of glass manufacturing and the possible channels of transmission between the various kingdoms in northeast Asia.

 


« Reception and Re-interpretation of the material culture of the other: Case studies from China and Korea between the 2nd century BCE and the 10th century CE »

KCB 106 Organizer: Shing MÜLLER

Panel abstract:

Archaeological studies on East Asia are frequently dedicated to the exchange of goods. Only a few researchers examine local responses to foreign stimuli: Many objects reveal their manufacture with local techniques, while they were modelled after a foreign example. Even more interesting are artefacts whose shapes and motifs were adapted to local tastes and usages. Incorporating foreign ideas, techniques and features into one’s own culture, and re-interpreting these in order to meet one’s needs, encouraged new cultural developments. Trades via the Silk Route and massive migrations of peoples between the 2nd century BCE and the 10th century CE enforced the encounter of cultures between East and West, North and South. As a result civilizations in China and Korea transformed frequently during this period. This panel shall explore the mechanism behind these changes, and thus the reception and re-interpretation on the basis of case studies from China and Korea.

 

9:00 Rebecca EHRENWIRTH: From Lacquer to Silver: The Transformation of the erbei 耳杯 cup in the Northern Dynasties [215]

9:20 Sonja FILIP: Taming beasts in Northern Wei tombs – The master/mistress of animals in Xianbei art [216]

9:40 Annette KIESER: Traces of “the other” in Six Dynasties (220-589) tomb findings [217]

10:00 Shing MÜLLER: From couch to funerary couch and table in Early Medieval China [218]

10:20 LIU Yan: Exotic Elements as Seen in Gold Ornaments of Han Elite Tombs [219]

10:40 Patricia FRICK: Pingtuo lacquer ware of the Tang dynasty and its foreign influences [219]

 

10:40 BREAK

 

11:00 Ariane PERRIN: Ancient Foreign Glasswares Found in Silla Burials in the Korean Peninsula [220]

11:20 Margarete PRÜCH: Imported or Made in Anhui?: Preliminary Ideas on the Origin of the Lacquer Objects from the Han Tombs at Chaohu, Anhui Province [221]

11:40 James LANKTON, B. GRATUZE: Understanding Early Asian Potash Glass: New Insights from Chemical Analysis and Archaeology [222]

12:00 LEE Nanhee: A Study on Goryeo Dynasty Incense Box with Angel Design in Mother-of-pearl Inlay [223]

 

 

 

 


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *